Lithuanian attractions

Places of Interest in Vilnius

M. K. Čiurlionis’ House (M. K. Čiurlionio Namai)
Although more famous for his painting, Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis (1875-1911) has quite a reputation as a composer.
This is the house in which the great man lived for a short time in a small room that can be visited. The rest of the building, which during Čiurlionis’ time was both a family house and a shop, features reproductions of his paintings and a small concert space.
Address: Savičiaus str. 11

More info [+]Less info [-]

The Gates of Dawn (Aušros Vartai)
Completed in 1522, the Dawn Gate is the only remaining gate from the city’s original defensive walls.
As was common at the time, an image of the Virgin Mary was placed above all gates to protect the city, and the story of the Dawn Gate starts from this simple historic fact. The current image, known as The Blessed Virgin Mary Mother of Mercy, was painted on eight pieces of oak in around 1630 by an unknown artist. Then it was embellished with gold and silver about 40 years after that and was housed inside a purpose-built chapel above the gate in 1706. It is believed to have magic healing powers. Interestingly, the Dawn Gate is revered by both the Catholic and Orthodox faiths and is such an important part of the city’s cultural heritage that it remained open throughout the Soviet occupation. Watch closely as people walking underneath say a silent prayer. The chapel is open to the public and is accessed via a small door on the left as you’re walking up the hill.
Address: Aušros Vartų str.12

More info [+]Less info [-]

Literatų street (Literatų gatvė)
This highly recommended permanent outdoor gallery on Literatų street is dedicated to writers past and present who have all left their mark on the city.
Comprised of small, mixed-media prints, drawings and paintings celebrating everyone from Jonas Mekas to Czesław Miłosz to Romain Gary. The gallery, all the work of local artists, grew from humble beginnings in 2008 and now features over 100 superb pieces.
Address: Literatų str.

More info [+]Less info [-]

Presidential Palace (Prezidentūra)
The official residence of the President of Lithuania, the Presidential Palace started life in the 14th century as a much smaller structure built at the behest of the city’s first Bishop Andrzej Jastrzębiec.
Many illustrious figures have spent a night in the building over the centuries, among them Tsar Alexander I, Napoleon Bonaparte and Polish national hero Józef Piłsudski (1867-1935) to name but a few. After independence in 1990 the building served several purposes until assuming its current role in 1997. The presidential flag can be seen flying over the building when the President is in residence or in the city. Changing of the Guard takes place on Sundays at 12:00.
Address: S. Daukanto Aikštė 3/8

More info [+]Less info [-]

Vilnius University (Vilniaus Universitetas)
Established in 1579 and one of the oldest universities in Eastern Europe, the splendid ensemble that makes up Vilnius University’s main campus buildings embraces just about every major architectural style of the last 400 years.
Originally belonging to the Catholic Church, the University became a secular seat of learning in 1773 and has remained so ever since. Closed for much of the 19th and the first 18 years of the 20th century. Famous past students who’ve studied here include the Polish Romantic poets Adam Mickiewicz and Juliusz Słowacki, the Lithuanian writer and historian Simonas Daukantas (see him on any 100 Lt note) and the Lithuania-born Polish Nobel Prize-winning author Czesław Miłosz. Vilnius University houses the oldest library in the country. It is also famed for its lovely 13 courtyards. The ensemble was fully restored in 1979 and is well worth investigating.
Address: Universiteto str. 3

More info [+]Less info [-]

Information from: http://www.inyourpocket.com